augusti 2018 – Xenit Technical

Monthly archives: augusti, 2018

SCCM 1806 – News and features

Once more it was time to upgrade our SCCM environment to the newest release that is 1806. As it was not released for everyone yet, I had to run the Fast-Ring script to allow the update to present itself. I found this update very interesting as it comes with some exciting new features, and there are alot. These are the ones that I am most excited about.

  • Ability to PXE boot without WDS
  • CMTrace installed as default on clients
  • Ability to exclude Active Directory containers from discovery
  • High availability on Site Server
  • CMPivot
  • Boundary group for peer downloads
  • Enhanced HTTP site system
  • Improvements to OS deployment
  • Software Updates for third-party

…and much more. You can read about all the new features here on Microsoft docs.

Since there are a lot of news, I have chosen to cover the two that I am most excited about in this new release.

CMPivot

Configuration Manager is a very helpful tool when gathering information, CMPivot now allows you to take it to the next step by real-time querying clients. This allows you to gather a lot of information instantly. This feature uses Azure Analytics Language, .

CMPivot is located under Asset and Compliance > Overview > Device Collection, you can find this new feature in the top ribbon bar.

Location of CMPivot

An example is to find BIOS-information about the Dell computers that are currently online. From this output you easily create a collection (the members of the collection will be added as Direct Members) or export to both CSV and Clipboard.

 

PXE Without WDS

It is exciting to have a new way of deploying over PXE. Since Windows Deployment Services has been available for a long time, it feel suitable to have an updated way of deploying clients. By replacing WDS, the distribution point will create the service ConfigMgr PXE Responder. If you have plans of using Multi-Cast, you are for now stuck with WDS.

This setting can be found under Administration > Overview > Distribution Point, right click on the distribution point you would like to modify with the setting shown below.

After applying this setting, Windows Deployment Services will automatically be disabled. Be advised that if you are monitoring this service, it will be report as stopped. SCCM PXE Without WDS

If you have questions, thoughts or anything you would like discuss? Send an email to Johan.Nilsson@xenit.se and I will be more than glad to talk about these topics.



Datetime and RFC3339 compliance in powershell – a deepdive

A collegue of mine asked if there is a way to output a RFC compliant datetime (https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3339.txt) in powershell without manually formatting in T and Z in the middle and end to comply with ISO standard and imply UTC +-00:00

 

Before i start with the how, I’d like to address the why.

If you’ve ever done some coding you’re sure to have encountered issues with datettime and possibly errors and incidents due to the timeformat of a datetime string.
For example, if I live in the US then time is commonly written in month-day-year format, which during the first 12 days of each month is indistinguishable from the european day-month-year format.
This is also encountered in code, for example in powershell my locale is Swedish and the ”Get-Date” cmdlet returns ”den 1 augusti 2018 16:35:24” which is easy and readable for a human.
However if i convert it to a string it becomes in US format even though my culture settings in powershell is set to swedish.
In my opinion this behavior is wrong as I expect to be given a ISO standard universal format, or at least a culture appropriate format. Instead I am given a US format.

With that said, developing automation and tools for global customers a standard format is much needed when we write to logs.

The How

After a short time on google it seems no one had done this properly in powershell. I also found out that XML is RFC compliant.

How did i do it?

Returns:

Great! Now let’s put it into some real code.

Example 1: Writing current date into a logfile

The output becomes a RFC compliant string and gets stored in the $now variable to be used into a out-file log operation.

Example 2: Writing a job deadline datettime

Here we create a datettime object, add 20 hours and then convert it to a RFC compliant datettime string and store it into the $RFCDeadline variable.

Hope this helps someone!