Tag: SCCM 2012 r2

Upgrade Task Sequence (1803) with BitLocker active

With the new 1803 feature update for Windows 10 we got some new and exciting commands for the Windows Setup that we can use in a upgrade task sequence in SCCM to be able to upgrade without suspending BitLocker. For more information about the 1803 feature update, please see this blogpost.

With these new Setup commands you can set a specific value in your task sequence that will try to keep BitLocker active or force it to be active during the upgrade. You can also use the AlwaysSuspend option but as the word explains this will actually suspend BitLocker and that’s not what we want in this post. The different commands are as follows:

  • /BitLocker TryKeepActive
  • /BitLocker ForceKeepActive
  • /BitLocker AlwaysSuspend

In your upgrade task sequence you need to set the variable OSDSetupAdditionalUpgradeOptions to one of the options above depending on how you want the upgrade to handle BitLocker. In this scenario we are using the /BitLocker TryKeepActive value that will attempt to do the upgrade without suspending BitLocker, but if the upgrade fails, Windows Setup will suspend BitLocker and complete the upgrade.

Please note that there are some requirements to get this setup to work.

  • The device being upgraded should be Windows 10 1709 or higher.
  • The Windows device needs to be using Secure Boot and have a TPM.
  • BitLocker needs to be using a TPM protector only.
  • The user profile folder can’t be on a separate volume that is also BitLocker protected.

 

If setup correctly you will find that the command line for the Windows Setup upgrade will add the /BitLocker TryKeepActive to it, as shown below. This can be viewed in the smsts.log.

 

If you have any questions, feel free to email me at tobias.sandberg@xenit.se.



SCCM – Shrink the SQL Server Reporting Services log and change the maxsize

The default maxsize value of the ReportServer logfile (ReportServer_log.ldf) is 2 TB. If you haven’t changed that value and your disk size is lower then 2 TB (which is very common) you will eventually fill up that entire disk space. When that happens you need to shrink the logfile before you are able to reduce the maxsize value so it fits your disk size better. In a couple of steps you can easily do this as I will describe below.

1. Shrink the log file.
Go into Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio, expand Databases and locate the ReportServer. Rightclick the database, go to Tasks, Shrink and choose Files as shown in the pictures below.

Task > Shrink > Files

Change File type to Log and select the Released unused space under Shrink action before pressing the OK button. It will now shrink down the log file to a couple of megabytes (instead of gigabytes) and you can go ahead to step two. If it doesn’t work please read below first.

Change File type: Log

If you experience trouble with shrinking the file (like it will only shrink a couple of megabytes or it won’t shrink at all) you need to change the recovery model from Full to Simple before doing the shrink step. To do that you need to go to the Properties of the ReportServer database and choose Options. Here you can change Recovery model to Simple.

ReportServer > Properties > Options

2. Change the maximum file size from the default 2 TB down to a size that fits your environment.
Rightclick the ReportServer database and choose Properties. Select Files in the list and go to the Autogrowth/Maxsize column for the ReportServer and press the button marked in red on the picture below.

ReportServer > Properties > Files

Change the maximum file size limit in megabytes so it suits your environment. Finish it by pressing the OK button.

Change maxsize



SCCM source cleanup inventory

As applications are retired in SCCM the source tend to build up due to human error or retention policy. Either way admins should perform cleanup of the source directory from time to time.
The below script lists all files and folders in the source directory that does not have any active connection in SCCM.

To run the script first open Configuration Manager Console and press ”Connect via Windows Powershell”

 



Automatisera skapandet av servicefönster i ConfigurationManager

När servicefönster skall skapas i Configuration Manager är det ofta en hel del klickande och det kan leda till mänskliga fel.

För att minimera risken för fel och effektivisera skapandet av servicefönster mot patch kollektioner skapade jag skriptet nedan.
Skriptet loopar igenom alla kollektioner som matchar $Collection parametern och sätter servicefönster enligt schema som specificeras.

Skriptet nedan är gjort för att köras från en Managementpoint men kan ändras genom att hårdkoda $ModulePath variabeln till ConfigurationManager modulen.