Tag: Windows

5 Things I check after I’ve installed Microsoft Edge Dev (Chromium)

Many of you probably already know that Microsoft have released their new Microsoft Edge built on Chromium as a Development-build for the public so we can try it out.

As usual when it comes to new things we want to personalize it, so I would like to share my first 5 things that I customize in this new version of Edge.
Before we begin, remember that this is a Dev-build (Version 76.0.152.0) so the things that I mention below might change when it is fully released.

Also worth mentioning is that this release is not built in to Windows 10, and that means that you have to install the browser like any other application out there.
You can find the download link at the bottom of this page.

 



Simplify removing of distributed content with the help of Powershell

Begin

TLDR; Go to the Process block.

Ever since I first got introduced to Powershell, I have always tried to come up with ways to include, facilitate and apply it to my my everyday tasks. But for me, using Powershell in combination with SCCM has never been the ultimate combination, the built in cmdlets doesn’t always do it for me, and the gui is most of the times easier to understand.

So when I got a request to simplify removal of distributed content on all distribution points or all distribution point groups, it left me with two options. To create a script what did the desired job, or to create a function that would cover all the possible scenarios. So I thought; “Why don’t I take these matters in my own hands and create what I actually desire?” That is why I created a script that helped to find the content wanted for removal, and to have the distributed content removed from every Distribution Point or Distribution Point Group.

Lets say that you have 10 Distribution Points, and you have distributed content to 5 out of 10, and you have not been using a Distribution Point Group, the way to go would be to repeatedly proceed with the following steps:


And to do these steps for every distribution point would just take forever. Of course, using one Distribution Point Group would of course be more effective and the ideal way to go, but you might have distributed it to multiple Distribution Point Groups? That is something that already has been thought of, and that is why this script is created. Even if you have distributed it to some distribution points, and some distribution point groups, it will all be removed.

Process

But how does it work? In this demonstration, I will have two packages distributed with similar names. One of them will be sent to a Distribution Point Group, and the other one to 2 Distribution Points. And I would like to have both of them removed from whatever they have been distributed to. 
1. Start by launching Powershell, and import the script by running “. .\Remove-CMAllSiteContent.ps1”

2. Run the script with the required parameters. As shown in the picture below, I searched for ‘TestCM’, but it resulted in showing multiple results. The search is done with wildcard, so everything similar to the stated PackageName will be found. All the parameters have a more detailed description in the script below.

  • The search can either be done with the parameter -PackageName or -PackageID,
  • The parameter -PackageName is searching with wildcards both at the beginning and the end of the stated name. This should be used when you are not sure of the PackageID, or want to remove multiple packages, 
  • The parameter -PackageID is the unique ID for the specific package you want to remove from the distribution point(s) or group(s). This should be used when you are sure of what you would like to remove,
  • The parameter -CMSiteCode is mandatory and must be specified. 

3. In this case, I would like to remove both of the displaying packages, so I choose 0 for ‘All’, followed by a confirmation (Y / N is not case sensitive)

4. After it has been confirmed, the script will check the following:

  • If the content is distributed to Distribution Point Group(s) as an Application,
  • If not, check if it distributed to Distribution Point Group(s) as a Package,
  • If none of these is correct, the script will check if the content is distributed on each Distribution Point as an Application,
  • If not, it will check if the content is distributed to each Distribution Point as a Package.

At the beginning of the script, the content is validated as distributed. If not, it will not be shown. These four steps above covers all distributed scenarios.

5. When finished, we can see that the Distributed content successfully has been removed.

Please read the comment based help to get a better understanding of what is actually running in the background.

End

This can of course be modified with more choices in every step, but at the moment I did not see the need for it.

If anyone have any questions or just want to discuss their point of view regarding this post, I would be more than happy to have a dialogue. Please email me at johan.nilsson@xenit.se or comment below.



Duplicate SRV records are cousing domain join workflows to fail

Have you ever had problems with duplicate SRV records in your environment? This is a quite common phenomenon when you google it without any real solution to it (not at least what I could find). Some environments would not be affected by this, but I got into a specific situation recently where some workflows in Nutanix would fail because of duplicate SRV records.

Symptoms:

  • Duplicate SRV records, one in lower-case – one in upper-case, are causing some workflows in Nutanix to fail.
  • When deleting the oldest record the duplicate is just recreated after some period of time (like 30 minutes or so).

So whats cousing this? In this specific case we managed (together with Microsoft support) to isolate the issue and found out that there were two main things that were related to this behaviour listed below.

Causes:

  • Some Domain Controllers names were in lower-case, others in upper-case.
  • When you have a mixture of DNS servers running Windows Server 2012 and 2016 the way that machine names are registered differs between those Windows versions.

So how do we solve this? The preferred solution from Microsoft was to rename all domain controllers to lowercase, but since all Domain Controllers except one, in this case, was in uppercase we tried to rename that specific DC to uppcase instead. The following steps were performed on the server:

    1. Demote DC
    2. Rename to uppercase
    3. Promote DC
    4. Delete all duplicated SRV records in DNS
    5. (If  the issue is still happening):
      1.  Stop netlogon service
      2. Delete C:\Windows\System32\config\netlogon.dnb
      3. start netlogon service

After doing this the duplicate SRV records stopped being recreated in the environment.

Resolution:

  • The preferred way to solve the issue is to rename all domain controllers to lowercase (or uppercase which works too).

If you have any questions, feel free to email me at tobias.sandberg@xenit.se or comment down below. I will try to answer you as soon as possible.



Windows Server 2019 Preview is now available

It’s finally here – the preview of Windows Server 2019!

Windows has release the first preview of the completely new Windows Server 2019. In this article I will summarize the main news and tell you a little about them. The final version of Windows Server 2019 are planned to be released in the second half of the calendar year 2018.

 

Hybrid cloud scenarios

  • Windows Server 2019 will come with the previously announced Project Honolulu (which is a modern server management interface). This will help you to more easily integrate Azure services (like Azure Backup, Azure File Sync disaster recovery) so you can use these services in a more convenient way.

Security

  • Shielded VMs was first introduced in Windows Server 2016 and was only available for Windows Server. In Windows Server 2019, support are added for Shielded VMs for Linux. VMConnect will be improved for troubleshooting of Shielded VMs for both Windows Server and Linux. Another new feature is called Encrypted Networks which will let admins encrypt network segments to protect the network layer between servers. Microsoft is also embedding Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) feature in the operating system which provides preventative protection, detects attacks and zero-day exploits.

Application Platform

  • Microsofts Goal is to reduce the Server Core base container image to a third if its current size of 5 GB. That will reduce the download time for an image by up to 72 % which will be a significant performance boost. Also, in Windows Server 2019 the choices available when it comes to orchestrating Windows Server container deployments are event better. Another new feature is the ability to run Linux containers side-by-side with Windows containers on a Windows Server.

Hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI)

  • Windows Server 2019 are adding adding scale, performance and reliability to HCI environments. With Project Honolulu (mentioned above) you will have the ability to manage HCI deployments which are a great new feature. This will help you simplify the management and day-to-day activities on HCI environments.

 

Read more about the preview here.

(if you want to compare this release with the previous release of Windows Server 2016, read this article)