Why does Teams not install for my users?

Microsoft released in October last year a MSI-installation package of Teams, making it easy to deploy Teams to computers in your organization. As you know Teams (for some unknown reason) installs directly into your profile. I suspect they have designed it this way to make sure everyone can install the application, even if you’re not an local administrator on your computer, you do have sufficient rights to your profile to perform a installation of Microsoft Teams.

Since I work primarily with Citrix, and could see the that Microsoft Teams is growing in popularity, I started to investigate if I could make it to work in a Citrix environment. But that is another story, you can read my blog post on how I installed Teams in our Citrix environment here!

Teams is supposed to install when a user logs on to the server, it will automatically install the latest Teams available to your profile and then start it. But in some cases I have seen an issue after installing the Teams wide Installer, the users simply does not get anything installed. A function this installer has is that it checks your profile for traces of Teams, if it detects part of Teams it will not try to install it again (if it’s not an update that is), and if the user uninstalled Teams it will still detect some left-overs and will therefore not install Teams again. With that said, you need to make sure your profile is clean from Teams. Unfortunately this was not the case here. It simply did not install!

To understand why this might happened you need to know how some multi-user environments are designed, from a security perspective!

If you are like us, security oriented, you might have disabled Run and Run Once witch is used by some applications to auto-start, or to continue a installation after a restart, and is unfortunately very popular place to auto-start viruses and other malware. It is then common to disable this.

This is exactly the place Microsoft Teams specify the value that starts the Teams installation for a user, if its disabled, nothing will ever happened!

There is however a really easy way around this:

You probably already thought about this by now but there is a tiny detail that will make it work exactly as it was supposed to:

  1. Create a Shortcut – Name it Install Teams (or something else if you like)
  2. Target the Teams.exe file with this specific argument: “C:\Program Files (x86)\Teams Installer\Teams.exe” –checkInstall –source=default
  3. Save it, and place it in the Startup folder in the Start Menu.

The last argument in the Target path (–CheckInstall –source=default) is the reason Teams knows if you have it installed and keeps it updated.

I hope this easy little trick has been helpful, please make a comment if you feel like it or have some questions!

Disclaimer: All information on this blog is offered "as is" with no warranty. It is strongly recommended that you verify all information and validate all scripts in isolated test environments before using them in production environments.